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Word of the Week

 

21st September
English word of the week - WITHERED
Meaning shrivelled up and drooping 
A single tear slid down the girl's face as she looked at the withered tree.
Synonyms - wilted, drooping, faded.
Antonyms - Thriving, flourishing.
It comes from the middle English word 'wydderen' meaning to dry up.
Math word of the week - SUM 
 
Meaning when you need to add two or more numbers together
Find the sum of 34 and 56.
Synonyms : add, plus
Antonyms : subtract, take away
14th September
English word of the week - DEVOURED

 

Meaning to eat with speed

 

I devoured the chocolate cake. 

Synonyms: chomped, gobbled

Antonyms: nibble 

 

It comes from the Latin, de meaning down and vorare meaning to swallow. 

 

 

 

Math word of the week - INFINITE

 

Meaning to be continued indefinitely 

The number sequence was infinite 

 

It comes from the Latin; in meaning not and fintus meaning finished 

 

7th September 
English word of the week - RETURN 

 

Meaning:  to come back

 

The children were all due to come back to school. 

Synonyms: come back

Antonyms: leave, exit 

 

It comes from the Latin re meaning back. 

 

 

Math word of the week - ANGLE

 

Meaning a space between two intersecting points. 

The angle measured 90 degrees. 

 

It comes from the Latin angulus meaning corner

 

16th March
Word of the week - VERTICAL

 

Meaning: straight up and down 

 

It comes from Latin verticalis meaning "overhead"
 
Antonyms: horizontal 
9th March
Word of the week - HORIZONTAL

 

Meaning: parallel to the horizon.

 

It comes from the Latin ‘horizontalis’ meaning the horizon.

 

The boy laid horizontal on the floor. 

 

Antonyms: vertical

Synonyms: level, even

 

2nd March
Word of the week - PARALLEL 

 

Meaning: When the sides or lines are side by side, the distance between them remains the same, they will never meet. 

 

It comes from Greek parall─ôlos meaning besides one another. 
 
The tracks lay parallel, never meeting.
The teacher asked me to draw a pair of parallel lines. 
 
Synonyms : aligned, side by side
Antonyms: divergent
24th February Word of the week - QUADRILATERAL

Meaning:  A shape with 4 sides.

Quad comes from the Latin of 4.
Lateral comes from the Latin side.

10th February
Word of the week - GRAND 

 

Meaning: Magnificent, important or large. 
 

It comes from the old french ‘me grand’ meaning of the highest importance. 
 

Synonyms: marvellous, noble, stately

Antonyms: bad, common, small
 

3rd February
Word of the week - NOON

 

Meaning : Midday 

 

At noon we have our lunch. 

 

Etymology: comes from the Latin, nona hora which means the ninth hour after sunrise. Therefore, originally noon was around 3pm. 

 

Synonyms: midday 

Antonyms: midnight

 

27th January
Word of the week - COURTEOUS

 

Meaning: polite and respectful.

 

Pakefield primary students are always courteous at our school.

 

Etymology: comes from the Old French 'curteis' meaning elegant manners. 

 

Synonyms: well mannered; respectful; polite

Antonyms: rude

 

20th January
Word of the week - CHRONOLOGICAL

 

Meaning: following an order of time, or from when events happened.

 

'Please give me the dates in chronological order'.

 

Etymology:

It comes from the Greek 'chronos' meaning time.

 

Synonyms: sequenced, in order.

Antonyms: Muddled.

 

13th January
Word of the week - VAST

 

Meaning immense, being of great size. 

 

She had a vast amount of knowledge.

 

It comes from the Latin 'vastus' meaning huge. 

 

Synonyms: Huge, extensive, wide.

Antonyms: tiny, small amount.

 

7th January
Word of the week - MONOTONOUS

 

Meaning: dull, tedious, lacking in variety, the same.

 

The wasteland's scenery was monotonous; mile after mile of red dusk littered the landscape.

 

It comes from the root 'Mono' in Greek. It means one, alone, the same.

 

Some examples of this:

Monarch, monocle, monopoly, monorail, monotone, monologue.

 

Synonyms : Dull, tedious

Antonyms: Varied, interesting, exciting.

 

16th December

Word of the week - EXOTIC

Meaning: unusual and exciting because of coming (or seeming to come) from far away, especially a tropical country.

The exotic foods were delicious.

Etymology:
It comes from the Greek root word exo- meaning outside.
Please discuss the root word exo and words with this prefix - exoskeleton, exothermic etc.

Synonyms : unique, unusual
Antonyms: familiar

 

9th December

Word of the week - INQUISITIVE  

 

Meaning: having or showing an interest in learning things; curious.

 

Etymology:

from Late Latin inquisitivus "making inquiry, or to seek information'.

Quis means to seek in Latin. This can be found in:

acquisition, exquisite, inquisition.

 

Suffix: 

 

inquisitively, adverb

inquisitiveness, noun

2nd December 

Word of the week - SERENDIPITY 

Meaning a happy accident. Or when you find something valuable by chance.

Nature has created wonderful serendipity.

It comes from:

The old English tale in 1754: coined by Horace Walpole, suggested by The Three Princes of Serendip, the title of a fairy tale in which the heroes ‘were always making discoveries, by accidents and sagacity, of things they were not in quest of’.

Synonym- happy accident

Suffixes-

Serendipitous - a serendipitous event

 

25th November

Words of the week - DUSK and DAWN.

Dusk:
When it starts to get dark.

It comes from the old English ‘dosc’ which means to obscure.

Synonyms- sundown, sunset, twilight.

Dawn:
The first appearance of light.

It comes from the old English dauen which means to become day.

Synonyms: daybreak

 

18th November 

Word of the week - OMINOUS

Meaning: suggesting something unpleasant/ threatening or evil is going to happen.

The clouds looks ominous as they rolled over the  stormy sea.

Etymology- it comes from the Latin omen.

Synonym - menacing, threatening.

Suffix- ly

 

11th November

As it is anti bullying week, we thought this word would work well:

Word of the week - CONSIDERATE

Meaning to show careful thought or to take care not to harm others.

It comes from:
The Latin, consideratus - to look closely.

Suffix - ly
Prefix- in

Synonym - thoughtful, mindful
Antonym - inconsiderate

 

4th November 

Word of the week - MYRIAD

Meaning many things

Etymology:
It comes from the Greek murioi, meaning 10,000 or countless

Synonyms:
Countless, boundless, infinite

 

28th October 

Word of the week - ASTRONOMICALLY

 

Meaning - very large / immense. 

 

Its root word is astronomy.

Suffix - ical.

 

It comes from the old Greek astronomos. 

Astro = star 

Nomos = arranging

 

14th October
Word of the week - INTRIGUE

 

Meaning: If something, especially something strange, intrigues you, it interests you and you want to know more. 

 

It comes from:

 The Old french intriguer  - to trick
The Latin intrigare - to muddle

 

Suffixes - ed and ing

 

Synonyms - engross, captivate

Antonyms - bore

 

7th October 
Word of the week - PERPLEXED

 

Meaning to be completely baffled and confused. 

 

It comes from the Latin - perplexus. 

 

Per - meaning through

Plexus - meaning entangled 

 

So put them together you have to work 'through' 'entangled' thoughts when you are perplexed

 

30th September
Word of the week - AMBLE

 

Meaning to walk at a slow and relaxed pace.

 

Amble comes from:

Old French ambler meaning : go steady

 and 

Latin ambulare meaning : to take a walk

 

23rd September

Word of the week - PERSEVERANCE

 

When you keep on trying even though you may be finding it tricky.

 

Perseverance comes from the Latin persevereus.

 

‘Per’ meaning very

‘Severeus’ meaning strict.

 

Therefore you must be very strict with yourself to never give up

 

 

Noticeboard

Parent Handbook September 2020 - please click here

 

Flu Immunisation Programme Letter September 2020 - please click here

  

Please remember that we are a no nut school.